Swan Lake

Roxane Stojanov and Florent Melac, “Swan Lake” “Le “Lac des Cygnes” (rehearsal) choreography by Marius Petipa, Le Ballet de l’Opéra National de Paris, Gala d’Etoiles, Casino Barrière Enghien-Les-Bains (May 2016) Source and more info at: Photographer Isabelle Aubert on Twitter Photographer Isabelle Aubert on Facebook Photographer Isabelle Aubert on Instagram

via Roxane Stojanov and Florent Melac — Ballet: The Best Photographs

Music In Wonderland: The White Rabbit’s Proof (Final Part 4)

[Alice asks the White Rabbit her final question about the relationship between stories and classical music.  If you missed Part 3, you can find it here.]

 

I just have one more question, Rabbit Dear.

What is it?

I understand that a tapestry can become a table, and a table a tapestry, but why should I bother with them when you are so much smarter than I and so know the tapestry’s benefits as a tablecloth much more than I? (It is true that the White Rabbit was never averse to a bit of flattery, but here I simply said what I thought.)

Why my dear, even if I am a bit better at the table-tablecloth conundrum (he did look a bit smug, though perhaps that was simply a result of using the word “conundrum”), seeing the tablecloth on top of the table is a valuable skill!

Why? 

Because tables are notoriously persnickety! One never knows where they’ve been and where they’re going.[1]

(I had always suspected this very thing of tables, and now here Continue reading

Music in Wonderland: The White Rabbit’s Proof (Part 3)

[Alice and the White Rabbit discuss the value of literary connections to classical music.  You can catch Part 2 here.]

I was a bit sleepy at this point from the tea, but as the Rabbit kept talking and as I liked to listen, I pinched my arm a few times and managed to stay awake.

Now my dear, do you think the Cow destroys the moon when he jumps over it in the music?[1]

I suppose he might…

But when you place a tablecloth on a table, like this one here, does there cease to be a table?

Why of course not!

 Does the table cease to be necessary?

I should say not! Without the table, the tablecloth would not be a tablecloth anymore, but just a cloth! (In reality, the tablecloth was just a cloth—rather a blanket that Continue reading

Music in Wonderland: The White Rabbit’s Proof (Part 2)

[Below, the White Rabbit begins asking Alice questions as they discuss classical music.  If you missed Part 1, you can find it here.]

ONE

To start, my dear, how do you read a book?

Why, from left to right of course.

And do you start at the middle and read from Chapter 3 straight on to Chapter 57 and back to Chapter 34?

Why, certainly not! (I huffed.)

Well why ever not?

One simply can’t jump around in “The Cow Jumped Over the Moon.” Otherwise, the Dish would have run away with the moon while the Cow laughed at the Diddle Dog.

Quite right, my dear—well said. Well then, how do you listen to music?

…The same way I read a book, I suppose.

 Very good—very good. Now, if you read a book in order and listen to music in order, what does that say about the book? Continue reading

Music in Wonderland: The White Rabbit’s Proof (Part 1)

You know, when I listened to music I never knew what was down from what was up, or what was up from what was down, or down was what or up what was down…oh, what to do! But you see, later when I met up with the dear White Rabbit (we had a spot of tea, though I don’t much see the point in having only a spot when you can have the whole thing), he explained it this way:

My Dear Alice, he said (he was quite fond of me the poor dear, and even more so when I fixed him up about the spot of tea), I don’t know a fugue-ata from a varicaglia,[1] but I do know Tweedle Dee from Tweedle Dum (I’m afraid I still do not!), the Mock Turtle from the Mad Hatter, the birthday cake from the…where was I?

The fugue-aglia?

Oh, yes! Well, I don’t mind telling you this, though it is strictly forbidden and…
Continue reading