Classic Literature: Winter Style

winter-wuthering-heights

Creating Classic Literature: Ghost Style (inspired by a Quirk Books Twitter prompt) was so much fun and people enjoyed it so much that I decided to make another one. So, in honor of this wintry season (and in slightly terrified expectation of what the weather will be like when I return to Chicago from South Carolina), here’s a list of classic literary titles with a wintry mix (pun intended)…

Hamlet It Snow (William Shakespeare)

Shivering Heights (Emily Brontë)

Snowby Dick (Herman Melville)

To Chill a Mockingbird (Harper Lee)

The Call of the Fire (Jack London)

Catch-22 Below Zero (Joseph Heller)

Or in the case of Chicago, more like Fahrenheit 451 Below Zero (Ray Bradbury)…

The Cold Man and the Sea (Ernest Hemingway)

Of Ice and Men (John Steinbeck)

As I Lay Drying (William Faulkner)

After being out in the snow, that is

Tess of the Furbervilles (Thomas Hardy)

i.e. me wrapped in my white furry scarf and hood

And specific to Chicago? Gone with the Wind (Margaret Mitchell), no change needed.

 

Stay warm and let me know what other wintry literary titles you can think of!

Twitter: @ifmermaids

8 thoughts on “Classic Literature: Winter Style

  1. Very funny and clever post, Aubrey!

    “Jane Frosty Air” (Charlotte Brontë), “To the Frostbitehouse” (Virginia Woolf), “Native Where’s the Sun?” (Richard Wright), “Guy Chattering” (Sir Walter Scott), “Aunt Arctica and the Scriptwriter” (Mario Vargas Llosa), “The Fridge of San Luis Rey” (Thornton Wilder)…

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Pingback: If Literary Characters Had Favorite Holidays | If Mermaids Wore Suspenders

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