Classical Music Stories: Romeo and Juliet

Romeo & Juliet balcony

A book lover’s guide to classical music

The opening is lyrical and tragic—the perfect representation of Romeo and Juliet’s star-crossed love. Although the lovers are able to manage a few tender moments together, the theme returns for an even further, all-encompassing, relentless tragedy in the thick, low, repeated notes. In fact, these few tender moments only make their tragic demise even more overwhelmingly heartbreaking.

Just when you think it can’t possibly get any more dramatic, it does. We hold our breath with Romeo and Juliet until the deepest, most devastating notes of the piece that ultimately seal their fate.

So far, this is one of my all-time favorite stories I’ve heard in music! Can you hear it? Or do you hear something else?

 

If you liked this post, you might also like Songs for Every Book: Romeo and Juliet.  

You can find more Classical Music Stories here.

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6 thoughts on “Classical Music Stories: Romeo and Juliet

  1. Hm… Very good piece of music. I can certainly hear why you came to Romeo and Juliet for the story. I am not sure though myself. I hear Phantom of the Opera and oddly enough, the visual I get is of a battle in the Eastern front in WWII.

    It is amazing the stories classical music tells. Very beautiful and powerful.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ahh, I can definitely hear Phantom of the Opera and the war! I love how people can connect to a single piece of music in different ways. Depending on the performer, the stories can be different, too!

      Like

  2. Pingback: When Poetry and Music Match: Blistering Baby Blue | If Mermaids Wore Suspenders

  3. Pingback: Romeo and Juliet in Top 40 Music | If Mermaids Wore Suspenders

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